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Grilling Safety

Updated: Jun 3, 2022



There's nothing like grilling up some burgers or steaks on a hot, nice summer day. However, on average about 10,600 home fires are started by grills each year (NFPA).

 

Before grilling up those yummy meals, take into consideration some of these safety tips.


Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should only be used outdoors.


The grill should be placed well away from the home, deck railings and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.


Keep children and pets at least three feet away from the grill area.


Keep your grill clean by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.


Never leave your grill unattended.


Always make sure your gas grill lid is open before lighting it.


If using a charcoal grill, keep in mind these additional tips:



There are several ways to get the charcoal ready to use. Charcoal chimney starters allow you to start the charcoal using newspaper as a fuel.


If you use a starter fluid, use only charcoal starter fluid. Never add charcoal fluid or any other flammable liquids to the fire.


Keep charcoal fluid out of the reach of children and away from heat sources.


There are also electric charcoal starters, which do not use fire. Be sure to use an extension cord for outdoor use.


When you are finished grilling, let the coals completely cool before disposing in a metal container.

 

Further statistics about Grilling Fires from the NFPA


July is the peak month for grill fires (18%), including both structure, outdoor or unclassified fires, followed by June (15%), May (13%) and August (12%).


In 2014-2018, an average of 19,700 patients per year went to emergency rooms because of injuries involving grills.** Nearly half (9,500 or 48%) of the injuries were thermal burns, including both burns from fire and from contact with hot objects; 5,200 thermal burns, per year, were caused by such contact or other non-fire events.


Children under five accounted for an average of 2,000 or 39%, of the contact-type burns per year. These burns typically occurred when someone, often a child, bumped into, touched or fell on the grill, grill part or hot coals.


Gas grills were involved in an average of 8,900 home fires per year, including 3,900 structure fires and 4,900 outdoor fires annually. Leaks or breaks were primarily a problem with gas grills. Ten percent of gas grill structure fires and 22% of outside gas grill fires were caused by leaks or breaks.


Charcoal or other solid-fueled grills were involved in 1,300 home fires per year, including 600 structure fires and 600 outside fires annually.


Seven out of every 10 adults in the U.S. have a grill or smoker*, which translates to a lot of tasty meals. But it also means there’s an increased risk of home fires.


In 2014-2018, fire departments went to an annual average of 8,900 home fires involving grills, hibachis or barbecues per year, including 3,900 structure fires and 4,900 outside or unclassified fires.


Facts and statistics from NFPA.org.



Did you know Southampton Fire Company is 100% volunteer? Go to our application page to learn how you can join! Or, donate to help us continue serving our great Southampton community.


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